time=money=time= project
Excerpt form the text by Joanne Richardson.

Economy ultimately reduces itself to the economy of time--Marx said somewhere. And vice versa, time reduces itself to economy--to measurement and circulation for profit. The symbolization of time by the clock (its representation as spatialization) is necessary for the calculation and the organization of life under the rules of conduct of business (exchange). At the inception of capitalist development, merchants discovered the "price of time" as a consequence of the calculability of space. Trade and the exchange of commodities entailed movement through space, and the time taken up by movement from a point to its destination led to the practice of attaching the money form to chronological time. 

Time = Money. A banal truism, though truisms always hide something precisely because they are self-evident. Last year in Zagreb, Darko Fritz enacted an "artistic" project--one of the new, modern trams of the city of Zagreb displayed Time = Money = Time on its electronic board. The tram's normal destination was from the city Kunsthalle to the central square. But this time, the tram did not follow its linear traversal of the city space, it just circled the Kunsthalle. Unsuspecting passengers got on the tram, which was free of charge, outside the economy of profit.  Frustrated, they didn't reach their destinations, since the tram moved through space but went nowhere. The economy of time as money (as time) has entailed, historically, a complex production of space--networks of canals, turnpikes, highways, train lines--which traverse social space (profane, sacred, personal, symbolic) and mark it as a representable, mapable geometric grid. But on this day, this particular tram in Zagreb was an active negation of its function as a means of transportation from point of origin to destination.  The tram became not transport, but pure movement, without destination, without goal Ö in a sense, without time.  This was one of several recent artistic projects originating in a territory labeled, not without ideological prejudice, "Eastern Europe"--projects that identify not with territory but with the act of movement itself, projects of impossibility insofar as they refuse the possibility of a project.  And this is also perhaps what separates them (by a distance that remains incalculable) from the "historical project" of the avant-gardes. 

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Recent projects by Vera Chase and other artists in Prague, and Darko Fritz in Zagreb took possession of trams, but only for a few hours.  In Slovakia, a group of artists and philosophers and other loose people made an action, which they refuse to call art, on a train that traveled from the center of Bratislava to the periphery of Kosice. Ioan Godeanu, a member of the Romanian non-group "The Institute," recently told me of plans "to take possession of a space," but added that "contrary to the 'cultural tradition' that has been consecrated in Western Europe since 1968, our space will be evacuated and not 'occupied.'"  Evacuation is a suggestive metaphor as a contrast to the revolutionary tradition of "occupation" of spaces--which, even if temporary, were always made in the name of a collective identity or a group (a territory in a conceptual sense). The identification with movement common to these recent actions on trains and trams is a dispossession of the identity of the group, a metaphorical emptying. It is a process of dissolution that no longer identifies with a national territory--and by extension with the "group" as a "micro nation" that founds itself through its laws and proclamations. 

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